The title Entropvisions is in homage to my mother, the poet and art critic, Harriet Zinnes. In 1990 New Directions published a collection of her poems titled Entropisms, a word she made-up combining entropy - the tendency toward disorder - and tropism - the growth towards or away from a stimulus. Similarly, my short reviews combine entropy and tropism by suggesting growth towards a vision of art from the chaos of the art world.

Kandinsky, Vicuna & Hesse at the Guggenheim
2022.7.20

Having worked on the Kandinsky catalogue raisonne as an intern at the Guggenheim eons ago, as well as seen umpteen shows of his work since then, I thought I knew my responses to Kandinsky really well. I've always liked his early work - the work he made in Russia and as a close neighbor to Paul Klee - but felt everything he did afterwards was dry and intellectual. The current show at the Guggenheim has revamped my opinions. Perhaps it was first walking through the ramps devoted to the very mediocre work by Cecilia Vicuna, which reminded me of thin undergraduate work, but when I got to the late Kandinsky's - which I viewed first - I was blown away by his grace, rhythm, elegant line, movement and perfectly-tuned color relationships. Like his early art, this late work had a kind of lyricism, but also the confidence that comes with a whole life of art-making. Seeing his late work first helped me to appreciate his mid-career art as well, seeing its rhythms and interconnections in a new light. Also at the museum is a small Eva Hesse show focused on one sculpture and its materials, a show I found disappointing for its lack of art work. The Kandinsky and Vicuna exhibitions are up through September 5, the Hesse plus a minor contemporary abstraction shows are through October 16, and of course the miraculous Thannhauser is permanent. I've posted Kandinsky in reverse chronological order, and then added the only few Vicuna pieces I felt were worth photographing, as well as the Hesse sculpture.

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Cecilia Vicuna

Cecilia Vicuna

Cecilia Vicuna

Cecilia Vicuna

Cecilia Vicuna

I posted this piece by Cecilia Vicuna not because I felt it worthy of photographing, which I actually don't, but rather to give a sense of her weak visual thinking. Apparently it's about life or some such thing, with the cliche color symbols of red representing life, black representing death, and white representing resurrection. Given that the strands felt randomly placed, with little to no formal relationships, I couldn't see anything other than the colors to differentiate the three phases of life

Eva Hesse